US Mortgage Rates Soar Slowing Down Home Sales

Rusty-Tweed

Rusty-Tweed

The list of things that affect homebuyers’ mood is quite extensive. In fact, anything from the state of the economy and home prices to politics can affect someone’s willingness to buy. One of the most obvious factors that determine how likely people are to take out a mortgage, however, is the interest rate. After all, the amount of money necessary to cover the cost of lending will usually be directly related to someone’s likelihood of taking a large loan. With that being said, how are the current interest rates in the United States affecting the housing market? Not well.

Growing Costs

Over the last seven years, interest rates on mortgages have constantly been increasing. In fact, some of the highest rates since 2011 were seen in May of this year. This means that the cost of taking out a mortgage is continuously growing. Given that the median home value is also slowly going upward and the recent tax law changes, homebuyers may lack the motivation to purchase.

The Direct Relationship

When it comes to financial decisions, there are always factors that are directly related to the choice one makes. For example, prices of gas are directly related to someone’s potential car purchase as gas will be a repetitive variable cost. When it comes to the housing market, mortgage interest rates have the same role. Just consider, for example, what will be the most important factors in determining if someone signs a 30-year long loan agreement. Undoubtedly, the interest rate is extremely important.

Given the compounding nature of mortgage interest rates, a minor difference of 0.5 percent could mean tens of thousands of dollars. For instance, if someone takes out a $100,000, 30-year mortgage at an interest rate of 3.5 percent, they will repay a total of $161,656. If that same loan comes at the interest rate of 4 percent, the total amount will accumulate to $171,870. Thus, more than an additional $10,000 will have to be invested into the loan due to a minor change in the interest rate. If the mortgage is greater, this is even more impactful, as the differences could be measured in hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Facilitating a Slower Market

With interest rates growing, buyers are not as likely to purchase. Given their lack of motivation, home builders will not exactly be eager to construct new homes. After all, it makes no sense for businesses to build homes that will not be sold soon. Thus, the supply becomes limited and causes the prices to go up. After all, when the number of homes in the market is limited, the buyers will have to outbid one another. In the long-run, such practice will cause the prices to increase.

Sadly, this could throw the entire market into a vicious cycle. The prices continue to go up, and buyers are forced to seek greater mortgages. Given the growing interest rates, however, those mortgages come at a very high cost. Thus, the buyers’ motivation diminishes further. Luckily, with the improvements in the economy and the low unemployment, the interest rate should slowly decline. If they do, buying homes will become a common practice.