Millennials and the Housing Market In 2018

Rusty-Tweed

Although millennials are associated with some negative terms, their buying power is hard to deny. A part of it has to do with buyers’ confidence levels running at a 15-year high and the economy performing well. Unfortunately, as many as 32 percents of all millennials in the United States currently live with their parents. Since these are individuals aged 20 to 36, their total number is around 75 million. So, there are presently almost 25 million young adults who still live at their parents’ homes.

Generally speaking, that number may not seem as impactful given the total population of the United States. It is, however, very impactful indeed. Having 25 million people out of the housing market indicates that there is a ton of untapped spending potential. Meaning, the overall economy is suffering because the housing market is not utilized to its full potential. So, what are some of the main reasons for this situation and how could it be fixed in 2018?

Employment Rates

Even without using empirical evidence, saying that the employment history has a lot to do with homeownership makes sense. Luckily, the United States is currently experiencing some of the lowest unemployment rates in the history. This indicates that the spending potential of young adults is amplified by the fact that most of them have jobs. Meaning, their power to purchase a home will steadily increase until they finally begin taking advantage of their financial abilities.

Interest Rates

Another factor that is undoubtedly motivating people, not just millennials, to buy homes are the low mortgage interest rates. Ignoring their short-run growth, current rates are low when compared to historical numbers. Adding the fact that a lot of experts believe how the average home prices will go up by 5 percent in 2019, the urgency to buy increases. Hence why it is reasonable to expect that millennials buying homes is just a matter of time.

Tax Laws

Although the previous two reasons are supporting millennials’ buying power, there are some issues at hand. The first one pertains to the tax laws that were recently changed. In 2017, President Trump facilitated a major tax overhaul in the last three decades. Doing so reduced the mortgage interest deduction, got rid of the moving expenses itemized deduction, and changed the tax property deduction. Although most of these are easy to understand, it will take some time for investors to get on-board. Meaning, those millennials that are in the real estate sector will need a few months to figure out ways around new provisions to maximize returns.

Low Supply and Rising Prices

Over the past two years, the supply of housing opportunities has considerably deteriorated. Given the high number of people that are not buying, many projects stopped, and homes are not getting constructed as fast. As a consequence, there are fewer homes than people want. When that happens, the equilibrium is shifted, and prices go up. The problem, however, is the fact that these prices are consistently rising. Although real estate investors love the trend, average buyers are not fond of it.

After all, when home prices are rising faster than workers’ salaries, they are unable to buy. Consider, for example, a market where the median property value went from $550,000 to $700,000 in 3 years. If somebody who lives there did not receive the same 27-percent increase in pay during those three years, they would not buy a home. Thus, low supply that causes prices to rise is another reason why millennials may be less likely to buy. Eventually, however, these trends should normalize to put the market back into equilibrium.

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